Insert Generic Six-Word Memoir Here, Please

Black ships with writing, candy-coated purple prose, and secret plots to murder Candace Wainwright

30,325 notes

prompts-and-pointers:

babbleslime:

Character development thing.

Plot points on this chart to represent how important these different aspects of a character’s life are to them. By doing that you can help determine what type of things your character deems to be most meaningful in their life, especially compared to others aspects.

A brief explanation of each aspect is below in case you’re confused about the meaning of any.

Physical Aspects

  • Strength: to have physical power and strength
  • Sex: to have sexual gratification and satisfaction
  • Possessions: to have objects and tangible things
  • Health: to have physical health and stability
  • Appearance: to have a good external appearance

Emotional Aspects

  • Love: to love and be loved, romantically or otherwise
  • Appreciation: to be appreciated by others
  • Attention: to be paid attention to
  • Security: to feel secure emotionally
  • Approval: to be approved by others

Social Aspects

  • Respect: to be respected
  • Friendship: to have friends
  • Intimacy: to be intimate with a partner or partners
  • Belongingness: to feel needed and belonged
  • Family: to be on good terms with/have a family

Spiritual Aspects

  • Inner peace: to be content with themselves
  • Purpose: to feel as though they are fulfilling a purpose
  • Self-sufficiency: to feel that they are able to provide for themselves
  • Growth: to feel as though they are growing and changing
  • Acceptance: to be able to accept themselves without consequence

This is an absolutely amazing exercise and I certainly recommend doing it. 

(Source: nokku-auto, via writeworld)

reference

258,467 notes

thewritersarchive:

This is an ultimate masterlist of many, many resources that could be helpful for writers/roleplayers.
→ GENERAL
Improvement
Improve Your Writing Habits Now
5 Ways to Add Sparkle to Your Writing
Getting Over Roleplaying Insecurities
Improve Your Paras
Why the Right Word Choices Result in Better Writing
4 Ways To Have Confidence in Your Writing
Writing Better Than You Normally Do
How’s My Driving?
Describing
A Description Resource
55 Words to Describe Someones Voice
Describing Skin Colors
Describing a Person: Adding Details
Emotions Vocabulary
90 Words For ‘Looks’
Be More Descriptive
Describe a Character’s Look Well
100 Words for Facial Expressions
To Show and Not To Tell
Words to Describe Facial Expressions
Describing Clothes
List of Actions
Tone, Feelings and Emotions
Masterlists
Writing Specific Characters
Character Guides
Writing Help for Writers
Ultimate Writing Resource List
Lots of RP Guides
Online Writing Resources
List of Websites to Help You Focus
Resources for Writing Bio’s
Helpful Links for Writing Help
General Writing Resources
Resources for Biography Writing
Mental Ilnesses/Disorders Guides
8 Words You Should Avoid While Writing
  Body Language
Body Language Cheat
Body Language Reference Cheat
Tips for Writers: Body Language
Types of Crying
Body Language: Mirroring
Grammar/Vocabulary
Words Instead of Walk (2)
Commonly Confused Adjectives
A Guide on Punctuation
Common Writing Mistakes
25 Synoms for ‘Expession’
How to: Avoid Misusing Variations of Words
Words to Keep Inside Your Pocket
The 13 Trickiest Grammar Hang-Ups
Other Ways to Say..
Proofreading
300+ Sophiscated and Underused Words
List of Misused Words
Words for Sex
100 Beautiful and Ugly Words
Words to Use More Often
Alternatives for ‘Smile’ or ‘Laugh’
Three Self Editing Tips
Words to Use Instead of ‘Walk’, ‘Said’, ‘Happy’ and ‘Sad’
Synonyms for Common Words
Alternatives for ‘Smile’
Transitional Words
The Many Faces and Meanings of ‘Said’
Synonyms for ‘Wrote’
A Case Of She Said, She Said
Writer’s Block
How to: Cure Writer’s Block
Some Tips on Writer’s Block
Got Writer’s Block?
6 Ways to Beat Writer’s Block
Tips for Dealing With Writer’s Block
→ APPLICATIONS
Application (Itself)
How to: Make That Application Your Bitch
How to: Make Your App Better
How to: Submit a Flawless Audition
10 Tips for Applying
Para (Sample)
Para Sample Ideas
5 Tips on Writing an IC Para Sample
Writing an IC Sample Without Escaping From the Bio
How to: Create a Worthy IC Para Sample
How to: Write an Impressive Para Sample
How to: Lengthen Short Para’s
Prompts
Drabble Stuff
Prompts List
Writing Prompts
Drabble Prompts
How to Get Into Character
Writing Challenges/Prompts
A Study in Writing Prompts for RPs
Para Prompts & Ideas
Writing Prompts for Journal Entries
A List of Para Starters
→ GUIDES
Personalities
Angry
Bad Asses
Bitches (2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7)
Childishness
Emotional Detachment
Flirtatious
The Girl Next Door
Introverts (2)
Mean Persons (2)
Psychopaths
Party Girls
Rich (2) 
Rebels
Sarcasm
Serial Killers (2)
Shyness (2, 3)
Sluts
Villains (2)
Witt
Disorders
Disorders in general (2, 3, 4, 5) 
Attention Deficit Disorder
Antisocial Personality Disorder
Anxiety (2, 3, 4, 5) 
Avoidant Personality Disorder
Alice In Wonderland Syndrome
Bipolar Disorder (2, 3)
Cotard Delusions
Depression (2, 3, 4, 5, 6)   
Eeating Disorders (2, 3)
Facitious Disorders
Histrionic Personality Disorder
Multiple Personality Disorder (2)
Narcissistic Personality Disorder
Night Terrors
Kleptomania (2)
A Pyromaniac
Posttraumatic Stress Disorder
Psychopaths
Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (2)
Sex Addiction (2)
Schizophrenia (2)
Sociopaths (2)
Disabilities
Aspergers Syndrome
Apathy 
Someone Blind (2)
Cancer (2, 3)
Disability
Dyslexia
Muteness (2, 3)
Stutter
Jobs/Hobbies/Beliefs
Actors
Ballet Dancer (2)
Christianity
Foreigners
Gamblers
Hinduism
Hitmen
Satanism
Smokers
Stoners
Taoism
Journalists
Vegetarians
Drugs
Alcohol Influence (2, 3, 4, 5)
Cocaine Influence
Ecstasy Influence (2)
Heroin Use
LSD Influence
Marijuana Influence (2, 3)
Opiate Use
Locations
Australia
Boston
California (2, 3)
England/Britain (2, 3, 4, 5)
New York
Prison
London
The South (2)
Genders
Females (2)
Males (2)
Transgenders
Supernatural
Vampires
Witches (2)
Werewolves
Other
Amnesia
Children
A Death Scene
Loosing Someone (2)
Old Persons
Physical Injuries (2, 3)
Sexual Abuse (2)
Fight Scenes (2, 3, 4)
Horror
Torture
→ CREATING CHARACTERS
Biography Writing
Components of Your Biographies
Character sheet (2, 3)
Need Help With Character Creation?
How to: Draw Inspiration for Characters From Music
How to: Write a Biography (2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11)
How to: Write a Fully Developed Character
How to: Create a Cast of Characters (2)
Writing an Original Character (2, 3)
Creating Believable Characters (2, 3)
Bio Formats (2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10)
Little Things You Can Add To Your Bios
Connections (2)
Titles
Bio Twists
Names
Female Names (2, 3, 4, 5)
Male Names (2, 3, 4, 5) 
Last Names  (2, 3, 4)
Personalities
Jung’s 16 Personality Types
Underused Character Personalities
Birth-Order: Personality Traits
The Difference Between Personality and Behavior
How to: Show a Characters Personality In a Paragraph
16 Character Traits
Underused Personalities
Personality Traits

Positive (2)
Negative (2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8)
Both (2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8)

Habits
Addictions and Bad Habits
Bad Habits
Character Habits
Character Quirks
Phobias (2)
Secrets
300 Possible Secrets to Give Your Characters
I Bet You Didn’t Know..
Character Plots And Secrets (2)
Celebrity Secrets
Secret Masterlist
Quotes
Song Lyrics Masterlist
Songs for Biographies
Favorite Quotes: TV and Movies
Favorite Quotes: Notable Authors
Favorite Quotes: Celebrities
Favorite Quotes: Popular Books (2)
Quotes From Songs
Character Quotes
Masterlist of Bio Lyrics
Masterlist of Bio Quotes
Masterlist of Song Lyrics
Biography Lyrics
A Masterlist of Quotes
+130 Quotes
The Quotation Garden
Mary Sue’s

A Mary Sue In The Inbox
Your Character Is A Sue, Not Just A Mary Or Gary
Not Writing A Mary Sue

→ WHILE ROLEPLAYING
Para Titles
100 Paragraph Titles
Para Titles - Song Title Edition (2,3)
A Whole Ton of Para Titles
350+ Song Titles
Para Titles For You (2)
Starters
How to: Create an interesting starter
How to: Make an Interesting Starter
Gif Conversations: A Guide
A Brief Guide to Starters
Interesting Gif Convesation Starters
Starters Masterlist
Gif Starter Posts
46 Interesting Gif Chat Starters
Ideas for Gif Chat Starters
Starters
Careers/Jobs
Masterlist: Jobs
Possible Careers for Characters
Artistic Occupations
Martha’s Vineyard Job Masterlist
Interesting Jobs
Locations/Settings/Activities
Para Ideas
Masterlist: Para Ideas
Top 50 Places for Starters
Writing Topics: Para Ideas
101 Date Ideas
68 Date Ideas
22 Date Ideas
Popular Places to Eat
Character Developement
Character Development Questionaire
Character Surveys
C.D. Questionaire
30 Day Character Development Meme
Character Development Questions (2)
100 Pt. Questionaire
IC and OOC Surveys
Online Test for Character Building
30 Days of Character Development
How to: Develop Characters
Get To Know Your Characters
→ ROMANCE
Romance (in general)
The Little Ways a Ship Gets Build
Roleplaying Relationships
8 Ways to Say I Love You
How to: Make a Set Ship RP Work
How to: Write a Romantic Scene
Do’s and Don’ts of Writing Relationships
Putting a Label on It
Synonyms for Love
Pregnancy (2, 3, 4, 5)
Smut
Smut Guide: Casual Sex
Smut Guide: For Beginners
How to: Write a First Time Sex Scene Romantically
How to: Smut - The Bare Bones
How to: Smut (For Virgins)
How to: Write Lesbian Smut
How to: Write Smut (2, 3)
How to: Write a Blowjob/Prepping for Smut
Smut Guides of Tumblr
Tips on Writing Sex Scenes
A Guide to Language in Smut
Domination and Submission
Making Love
A Smut Guide
Kisses
How to: Write a Kiss (2)
Different Types of Kisses
Writing Out the First Kiss
→ OTHER
Plot Writing
How to: Create the Best Plot for Your RP
How to: Create A Plot Outline in 8 Steps
How to: Write A Plot in 12 Steps
How to: Write A Quality Plot
How to: Spice Up Your Roleplay Plots
Components of Your Plot Page
Writing Up A Plot
Basics of Writing A Plot
Links for Plot Writing Help
Eight Unique Plot Ideas
Plot Twists
Situation Ideas (2, 3)
Guide to Plotting
Eras
Eras Masterlist
Everything You Need to Know Abut the 20’s
20’s Slang
Primary Sources on Ancient Civilizations
How to: Play the Greek Goddess ‘Harmonia’
How to: Roleplay In the Victorian Era
Victorian Dialogue

thewritersarchive:

This is an ultimate masterlist of many, many resources that could be helpful for writers/roleplayers.

→ GENERAL

Improvement

Describing

Masterlists

  Body Language

Grammar/Vocabulary

Writer’s Block

→ APPLICATIONS

Application (Itself)

Para (Sample)

Prompts

→ GUIDES

Personalities

Disorders

Disabilities

Jobs/Hobbies/Beliefs

Drugs

Locations

Genders

Supernatural

Other

→ CREATING CHARACTERS

Biography Writing

Names

Personalities

Personality Traits
Habits

Secrets

Quotes

Mary Sue’s

→ WHILE ROLEPLAYING

Para Titles

Starters

Careers/Jobs

Locations/Settings/Activities

Character Developement

→ ROMANCE

Romance (in general)

Smut

Kisses

→ OTHER

Plot Writing

Eras

(via fuckyeahcharacterdevelopment)

67,806 notes

demonhunting:

fuckyeahcharacterdevelopment:

aetherial:

Checklist for character development.
Created by myself, compiled from questions gleaned from several sources, and some of my own additions.
It should be noted, that not every character will check every one of these things off. It is not REQUIRED to have all this information, but this checklist is, rather, a guideline for helping you think of your character as an entire, three dimentional being with thoughts, feelings, possessions, contradictions and background.
A character is 20% revealed to the reader, 80% writer/author/Mun knowledge. What the Reader sees is just the tip of the iceburg, but without the other 80% the character can’t help but come off feeling shallow. There’s nothing beneath the surface -  KNOWING as much bout your character as possible, instrinsicly, in detail, intimately, can do nothing but help build believability and dimension to your character.
Use only the things on this list that you feel are important, but I would like to remind you that the reader learns a lot about a character NOT through exposition (that’s kind of a cheat, and always feels , to me, like a rather clunky way of conveying knowlege), but through their actions, quirks, thoughts, and even through the things they own and carry with them. What kind of food they eat and how they eat it. What they wear. What they carry in their wallets.  I encourage you, as writers, to consider these things when creating a character, and encourage you MORE to leave the exposition out and tell us about your character through these other means!
If nothing else, this will give you a LOT to work with when writing with your character. Maybe it’ll spur you to write about the character’s parents. Or the relationship between them and their family. Maybe you’ll find yourself inspired to write something about how they lost everything in a fire  - and the importance each remembered lost item held.
There is certainly no rule that says you HAVE to do it this way, but invariably, the most memorable characters are the ones that we as readers can relate with. It’s hard to relate with just words - but people - with beliefs and dreams and fears -  that’s something we can get behind.
I certainly hope you find this useful, and since so many have been inclined to reblog and like this, I shall endeavor to add more character creation and writing tips, lists and excercises up on this blog!

I think this is the most beautiful thing I have ever seen.
- Pen

i think i just orgasmed

demonhunting:

fuckyeahcharacterdevelopment:

aetherial:

Checklist for character development.

Created by myself, compiled from questions gleaned from several sources, and some of my own additions.

It should be noted, that not every character will check every one of these things off. It is not REQUIRED to have all this information, but this checklist is, rather, a guideline for helping you think of your character as an entire, three dimentional being with thoughts, feelings, possessions, contradictions and background.

A character is 20% revealed to the reader, 80% writer/author/Mun knowledge. What the Reader sees is just the tip of the iceburg, but without the other 80% the character can’t help but come off feeling shallow. There’s nothing beneath the surface -  KNOWING as much bout your character as possible, instrinsicly, in detail, intimately, can do nothing but help build believability and dimension to your character.

Use only the things on this list that you feel are important, but I would like to remind you that the reader learns a lot about a character NOT through exposition (that’s kind of a cheat, and always feels , to me, like a rather clunky way of conveying knowlege), but through their actions, quirks, thoughts, and even through the things they own and carry with them. What kind of food they eat and how they eat it. What they wear. What they carry in their wallets.  I encourage you, as writers, to consider these things when creating a character, and encourage you MORE to leave the exposition out and tell us about your character through these other means!

If nothing else, this will give you a LOT to work with when writing with your character. Maybe it’ll spur you to write about the character’s parents. Or the relationship between them and their family. Maybe you’ll find yourself inspired to write something about how they lost everything in a fire  - and the importance each remembered lost item held.

There is certainly no rule that says you HAVE to do it this way, but invariably, the most memorable characters are the ones that we as readers can relate with. It’s hard to relate with just words - but people - with beliefs and dreams and fears -  that’s something we can get behind.

I certainly hope you find this useful, and since so many have been inclined to reblog and like this, I shall endeavor to add more character creation and writing tips, lists and excercises up on this blog!

I think this is the most beautiful thing I have ever seen.

- Pen

i think i just orgasmed

(via jouhn-gafffphaerjy)

writing

1,432 notes

Writing Tips: Imagery

thepenspointofview:

If your imagery always ends up sounding as if someone is just telling the reader what’s going on, think about these tips:

- Use literary devices.

This just might end up being the easiest way to enhance your writing. Make sure you are familiar with literary devices, including: alliteration, metaphors, similes, foreshadowing, personification, etc. Incorporate them in your writing.  Just don’t say: “Flowers stood in the meadow.” Say “The flowers filled the meadow, making the vast plain appear as if it was Van Gogh’s painting palette.” Some literary devices could affect the flow or mood of your imagery, like alliteration. Others will subtly add depth to your book as a whole such as foreshadowing. The literary devices most commonly used to make imagery interesting and vivid are the ones such as metaphors, similes, and personification.

-Avoid cliches.

Cliches are used because they are convenient. If you are stuck on a character design, plot, or imagery, it’s much easier to write something that’s already done than take the time to figure out something completely new. Be creative. Don’t say, “She was on cloud nine.” Say, “She smiled and squealed louder than a piglet getting food.” The more original or obscure your imagery is, the more impact your imagery will have. 

-Avoid using too many adverbs.

Adverbs rarely add imagery, because they tend to only state or explain what something is doing. In other words, they don’t describe the scene. While one or two is fine on occasion, if you overuse adverbs, your piece will seem very boring. If you try to write a piece without adverbs, you will most likely realize that your piece will not only have more imagery, but will be longer too. This is because you had to add more details than just writing one word. 

- Use all five senses to portray a scene, not just one.

While showing what someplace looks like is often important, sight is not the only sense humans have. In fact, sight isn’t even the sense humans tend to remember most vividly (that award goes to smell). Imagery will hold more interest if you also describe what something smells, sounds, feels, or even tastes like. For example, the city may be full of skyscrapers, cars, and people, but what else do you remember about it? The stench coming off someone sleeping in a tattered jacket by the subway? The crying of a child who’s tired of walking? What does the chili cheese dog that the business man is eating taste like? 

-Don’t overdo it.

While run-on sentences can be used for imagery purposes, don’t make every sentence you write one, as it can ruin impact and bore your reader after a while. Also keep in mind that if you are still describing what the outside of someone’s house looks like and you’re on page three, maybe it would be a good time to cut back on the scenery. After all, too much of a good thing can often be just as worse as too little. Find a balance between the two extremes. 

(via prompts-and-pointers)

writing dusty still exists?

59,050 notes

madmeeper:

hookteeth:

mrpunchinello:

nightmareloki:

theshieldtech:

reporterinyellow:

tmnt2k12:

100 Roleplay Scenarios!


Here’s How It Works!

  1. You and your RP group elect one RPer to roll the 100-sided dice. If you can’t decide, just go in alphabetical order of your tumblr roleplay blog usernames. Don’t worry, everyone will get a turn. (If you change your name to get ahead, you will be skipped over until the next time they get to your name. No excuses. Fair is fair).
  2.  Rolling the dice is easy: you go to this site, select “100” from the drop down list for number of sides, “1” for number of dice to roll and “1” for number of rolls. You are only allowed to roll once.
  3. Whatever number comes up, you look up the corresponding number on the scenario list above and figure out a way for your character to instigate it or introduce it. Be creative. Many of these scenarios are left open-ended and vague so the interpretation is entirely up to you.
  4. Watch the scenario unfold.
  5. Repeat once everyone gets bored/or when you want to heighten the stakes. Make sure you’re communicating with your RP group via OCC chat.
  6. Enjoy! :)

Keep in mind, that this isn’t just for the RPers out there. If any writers or artists are feeling stuck, you can use any of these scenarios as a prompt. Pick and choose or roll the dice and see what comes up.

Happy Imaginative Play!

Note: if Reposting, credit tmnt2k12.tumblr.com as the source. Please and thank you.

OOC; OMFG GUYS CAN WE DO THIS AKLSDJF

[Anyone?]

WOW YES

THIS IS VERY RELEVANT TO MY INTERESTS.

These’d make amazing tiny writing prompts too fff ;o;

I should put these forwards to our GURPS group.

ALL OF THESE LEGITIMATELY POSSIBLE. Or have already been done ahaa-

Lessie which can be applied to the GURPS plotline so far. 1, 2, 5, 6, 8, 9, 22, 32, 33, 34, 40, 44, 47, 49, 58, 73, 74, 75, 82, 93, 95, 98, 99

Crazy shit happens alot.

Im gonna use this when I run out of Heth ideas. xD

(via jouhn-gafffphaerjy)

writing

26,575 notes

brighten your smile!: Character Sheets and character creation →

thatfrenchhelper:

image

When creating a character, there’s a lot of questions you ask yourself. Whether it’s an original character or one you’ve been playing for a long time, using a character sheet to get to know your character better can always be a nice idea. With it’s help, you’ll be able to think about things you didn’t necesarily thought about, and ask some important questions to yourself that might activate your character’s voice, or help you to get your muse back with them. Everyone has their favorite character sheets, some people prefer to have a lot of questions, some others like it a bit more vague, so here’s a masterlist of the character sheets I found on various websites and found quite interesting, plus some other things that could be used to help you see, for example, how other character view yours. 

With these sheets, you could also try to find your character’s Jung and Enneagram Type or use the Moral Alignment tool. All of these things can be really useful to get a better grip on a character.

Then, if you’re trying to create a character, and do not have many ideas, or get stuck, I’d suggest for you to roam around TVTropes, which gives you a lot of tropes used for character creation. Maybe you could try to mix a few of these and create an original character?

Or, if you’re a skillful writer and know how to make your character different from another, make a list of characters in fiction you happen to find interesting and why. Try to keep it short. Then, maybe, try to mix and match things from two or three characters, take a character and change their backstory, to see what would change. Play with them to inspire yourself and create something new, original and truly yours.

Oh, and here’s a little guide to Mary-Sues and OCs, just in case you want to make sure your character isn’t going to become a Mary-Sue or a Gary-Stu

And last but not least, this article about building fictional character definitely seemed interesting to me, and is full of many other links that could guide you during the creating of your character and help you file one of these sheets.

(via crazyhecallsme)